As part of the MJA3 and the Clean and Efficient Agricultural Sectors Covenant, the objective of the Dutch dairy sector is improvement of the energy efficiency by 2 percent. FrieslandCampina complies with this objective by achieving an average energy efficiency improvement of 2 percent per year in the production of dairy products at the production locations.

By saving energy and producing sustainable energy, the dairy farming sector can contribute to the reduction of the use of fossil fuels and the emission of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide CO2, nitrous oxide N2O and methane CH4. The use of energy per ton product is reduced by investing in energy-efficient installations. For example, the new production location of FrieslandCampina in Borculo uses certified sustainable pyrolysis oil with a very low direct CO2 emission for its energy supply. Investments have been made for more efficient use of energy in, among others, the production locations of FrieslandCampina in Leeuwarden, Veghel and of Alaska Milk Corporation in Makati City (Philippines).

Energy efficiency

The energy efficiency of FrieslandCampina remained with 2.67 GJ/ton product virtually equal to last year. Because of the growth of the production of infant nutrition and the increase of the milk supply, more products requiring a more energy-intensive production method were produced.

Since 2015, member dairy farmers can maintain an energy scan in Foqus planet and they are rewarded when their total use of energy is below 1,300 kJ/kg milk. The period for completing the energy scan annually runs from 1 February to 31 January. 58 percent of the member dairy farmers participated in the energy scan. With 29 percent of them the use of energy is below 900 kJ/kg milk. Member dairy farmers are rewarded when their total energy consumption is less than 1,300 kJ/kg milk.

Dilemma
In order to realise the climate-neutral growth objective for 2020, FrieslandCampina is investing in new technologies, such as wind turbines, geometric heating systems or mono fermentation for converting manure into biogas. However, these investments are dependent on licences of local governments or subsidies. In many cases this delays the time schedules of these investments. FrieslandCampina wants to cooperate more closely with governments in order to be able to better anticipate this in the development processes.

Greenhouse gas emissions

The greenhouse gas emissions increased by 5 percent in 2015. The main reason for this is the increase of the milk production by the member dairy farmers by 6 percent. The largest part of the greenhouse gas emissions comes from the dairy farms (scope 3). These emissions can mainly be traced back to the cows. Methane (CH4) is released through rumen fermentation and during the storage of livestock manure. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is also released when storing livestock manure and converting nitrogenous fertilisers in the soil. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is released when using fuels and generating energy. In order to be able to add up the various gases, the greenhouse effects of methane and nitrous oxide are converted into CO2 equivalents: 1 kilogram methane CH4 equals about 28 kilograms CO2 and 1 kilogram nitrous oxide (N2O) equals about 265 kilograms CO2. The average greenhouse gas emission of a Dutch cow is 1.24 kg CO2 equivalent per kilo milk, while the global average is 2.4 kg CO2 equivalent per kilo milk.

In table below the climate-neutral growth performance is compared with the reference year 2010. The figures show a positive effect resulting from the measures taken by the production plants for reducing the emission of greenhouse gases and purchasing green electricity. However, this decrease has been undone by the increase of the milk production at the member dairy farms.

In the table the climate-neutral growth performance is compared with the reference year 2010. The figures show a positive effect resulting from the measures taken by the production plants for reducing the emission of greenhouse gases and purchasing green electricity. However, this decrease has been undone by the increase of the milk production at the member dairy farms.